Love & Gelato- Jenna Evans Welch

I chose Love & Gelato without even reading the description. The title was enough for me : summery and playful. I presumed this book would simply be about falling in love in Italy, without much else to the narrative, but I was pleasantly surprised. You needn’t be put off by what some might describe a ‘sickly sweet’ title (pardon the pun, given the gelato reference), as it’s not all about romantic love, there’s something a little deeper in there, too.

I like Lina, the main character, because she doesn’t fall into any stereotypical categories of teenage girl. Rather than being delighted to spend her summer in Tuscany, dreaming of catching a killer tan and finding herself a gorgeous Italian husband, Lina couldn’t be less fussed. It’s very clear that she’s only there because it was her late mother’s dying wish, but she’d really rather be at home.  During the narrative, she’s wary about everything that comes her way,  rather than jumping at the chance to go to the parties she is invited to, she considers her option. This whole attitude is quite refreshing and it makes her character seem more realistic, as she doesn’t fit into a cookie cutter category.

In fact, the author seems to have a gift for creating characters, as each with a major role in the narrative really did feel real and relatable, and I had no problems with creating mental images of them, or their voices. Her trick seemed to be not overloading, as each character serves a real purpose, and each get their own ‘screen time’, so to speak, However, I do feel that I would like to learn more about them, and spend more time with each character, so I definitely would be interested in a sequel.

Soon after arriving, a couple of things happen that, though she might not realise at the time, change her entire opinion on staying in Italy. The most important of which is her mother’s journal, which helps her on the quest to find her father- a journey which is not quite as smooth or romantic as one might hope or imagine. The journal is a great narrative technique that allows us to learn about Lina’s mother and hear her voice, without her having a real presence in the narrative. This makes it easier for the reader to make judgements later on in the book, where her honesty is questioned.

Though Lina’s such a likeable character, and I really did want the best for her for the entirety of the book, the ‘bumps in the road’ did make for a better read. I was unsure of how the story would resolve itself, and was pleased to see it perhaps wasn’t what I might have imagined from the beginning.

Love & Gelato kept me interested from start to finish. Perhaps not because it was the most complicated story, but instead because the characters all seemed so genuine, and I cared about what was in store for them. The great thing about this book is that it explores love on multiple levels, and ends with an important lesson about what love can mean (on more than a romantic level). I don’t have any criticisms of Love & Gelato, it was just the sort of heartwarming book I love.

La femme gelée- Annie Ernaux

I had read one of Ernaux’s other works, La Place, in the first year of uni, and I remember it being the one text that made that module bearable. Her writing style just feels so right, and her feminist sentiments seeps into her every word, without being overbearing, so I knew that I would like La Femme gelée.

What I liked most about La femme gelée is that, unlike other feminist texts, where the writer seeks to escape the oppression of their childhood, Ernaux realises that her childhood situation was actually the exception to the rule. Instead of urging her to start a family and settle down, Ernaux’s family encourage to be career driven and successful. It is then later in her life that she has to learn that it might not always be so easy, and that one can’t necessarily escape the patriarchy forever.

The non-linear narrative is interesting, and I suppose might reflect the struggle against the patriarchy as changing and inconstant. But I also think it could reflect Ernaux’s own inner struggle and confusion at how what she knew as normal from her child can be so different to the reality of her adult life.

In spite of the fact that La femme gelée is very much an account of a real woman’s life, the writer manages to distance the narrative from herself just enough that it could easily be about any woman, meaning it could represent the life and struggles of so many, but with enough detail to keep it real and relatable.

The heartbreaking thing about this work is that it is true life, and that a woman as driven and intelligent as Ernaux could not, through no fault of her own, have all that she wanted and deserved. More than anything, this book affirms the truth that women, men, all genders, should decide their own place in society, and should not have roles predetermined for them. Read this book for a different perspective of how restrictive the patriarchy can be.