The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square- Lilly Bartlett

I loved this book from the very start, there are no two ways about it. It may not have been the most complex or twist-filled novel that I have ever read, it was light and heartwarming. This was exactly what I needed on a five hour coach journey, where anything too serious would have been impossible to focus on. I also managed to read The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square from start to finish in said coach journey- not because I was desperate to find out what happened next (that much was almost obvious), but because I genuinely cared about the characters and reading about them made my heart warm.

The whole time I was reading The Big Little Wedding In Carlton SquareI couldn’t help but think a lot about Me Before You – though the couple definitely don’t meet in the same way, their family backgrounds are more or less the same: a working class girl whose family are incredibly important to her, and a privileged man whose always hand things handed to him on a plate. I mean, that’s pretty much where the similarities end, but  Emma Liddell’s character – in her mannerisms and speech and values, very much reminds me of Jo Jo Moyes’ Lou Clark – which I liked!

I like how the author portrayed the two different families, without overdoing it in terms of stereotypes. I suppose that Daniel’s family are slightly over exaggerated, but not to the point that it’s embarrassing to read- but just perhaps how it may feel for a working class family to suddenly be around incredibly wealthy people. Perhaps if the narrative was told from Daniel’s point of view, we would see a similar sort of representation of the Liddells.

At the best of times, weddings are a source of dispute, let alone when the bride and groom come from completely different worlds. However, what I like is that Emma always manages to stay true to her roots, and doesn’t let the temptation of an extravagant wedding paid for by her in-laws override her loyalty to her family.

Ok, so the characters didn’t necessarily have the most complex stories behind them, but for a book like this it didn’t really matter. I would say that  the most important part of the characters in The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square is seeing who they become after their experiences in the novel, rather than how their past experiences affect the narrative itself.

At times, there are worries that the wedding is going to be a disaster, as white lies are told and false promises are made between the two families. But its great to see the community spirit on Emma’s side (important to me, as I come from a close family with a wide network of friends who always want to help out) help to pull off a beautiful wedding that even impressive some of Chelsea’s most wealthy people, without them even realising.

If you are looking for a complex and shocking novel, then perhaps this isn’t the read for you. But if you simply want to read a book that makes you smile and feel good about people, then I definitely recommend The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square

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