The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square- Lilly Bartlett

I loved this book from the very start, there are no two ways about it. It may not have been the most complex or twist-filled novel that I have ever read, it was light and heartwarming. This was exactly what I needed on a five hour coach journey, where anything too serious would have been impossible to focus on. I also managed to read The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square from start to finish in said coach journey- not because I was desperate to find out what happened next (that much was almost obvious), but because I genuinely cared about the characters and reading about them made my heart warm.

The whole time I was reading The Big Little Wedding In Carlton SquareI couldn’t help but think a lot about Me Before You – though the couple definitely don’t meet in the same way, their family backgrounds are more or less the same: a working class girl whose family are incredibly important to her, and a privileged man whose always hand things handed to him on a plate. I mean, that’s pretty much where the similarities end, but  Emma Liddell’s character – in her mannerisms and speech and values, very much reminds me of Jo Jo Moyes’ Lou Clark – which I liked!

I like how the author portrayed the two different families, without overdoing it in terms of stereotypes. I suppose that Daniel’s family are slightly over exaggerated, but not to the point that it’s embarrassing to read- but just perhaps how it may feel for a working class family to suddenly be around incredibly wealthy people. Perhaps if the narrative was told from Daniel’s point of view, we would see a similar sort of representation of the Liddells.

At the best of times, weddings are a source of dispute, let alone when the bride and groom come from completely different worlds. However, what I like is that Emma always manages to stay true to her roots, and doesn’t let the temptation of an extravagant wedding paid for by her in-laws override her loyalty to her family.

Ok, so the characters didn’t necessarily have the most complex stories behind them, but for a book like this it didn’t really matter. I would say that  the most important part of the characters in The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square is seeing who they become after their experiences in the novel, rather than how their past experiences affect the narrative itself.

At times, there are worries that the wedding is going to be a disaster, as white lies are told and false promises are made between the two families. But its great to see the community spirit on Emma’s side (important to me, as I come from a close family with a wide network of friends who always want to help out) help to pull off a beautiful wedding that even impressive some of Chelsea’s most wealthy people, without them even realising.

If you are looking for a complex and shocking novel, then perhaps this isn’t the read for you. But if you simply want to read a book that makes you smile and feel good about people, then I definitely recommend The Big Little Wedding In Carlton Square

Perfect Remains- Helen Fields

When I first began reading Perfect Remains, I wasn’t fully convinced that it was going to reach my standards of a crime thriller. Yes, it was set in the UK; and yes, it featured a weird individual who manages to fool the police (at least for a while). But something just didn’t feel right.

I think I hadn’t full registered the novelty of what it was that this novel’s killer was doing differently to criminals in other books I had read: he wasn’t actually killing. Or rather, he wasn’t actually killing who everyone thought he was. The clever thing about King is just that: his crime is so intelligent; he pre-plans every piece of minutiae that the police may be interested in when exploring the disappearance, and murders, of people. This meant that there was always tension when the police believed they had discovered something about their criminal, but the reader already knows better.

I liked that Detective Inspector Callanch’s character has depth: his story is about more than what we read in Perfect Remains, and it’s great that Fields lets this seep into the narrative, as it gives an explanation to his reasons for making certain choices- whether he is aware of this or not. I must admit, however, the focus on his ability to speak french does seem a little forced at times. Obviously it is another level of his personality, but it did seem that the author allowed this to take up more of the narrative than really necessary.

I didn’t necessarily develop empathy for any character in particular, but I did come to feel very strongly about King by the end of the narrative. It was frustrating that someone who appeared so ordinary and harmless to the outside world could be so twisted behind closed doors. This meant that the anticipation of his capture was constant throughout the novel- he couldn’t have been discovered fast enough. Though, I must admit, his name did rather appear out of nowhere: apart from the initial false suspect, the police didn’t need to waste their time with anything else- I wonder how close to reality this is.

What I liked most about Perfect Remains was that the reader always knows everything. It creates a sense of power over the narrative, and means you can almost feel like you’re outsmarting the police (even though, in reality, you are simply being handed the information). In spite of its minor flaws (namely the heavy focus on Callanch’s bilingualism and the fact that the discovery of King as a suspect happened very conveniently), I would definitely recommend this book. It has the perfect amount of suspense, with the right balance of realism and gore. Have a read!

The Apple Orchard – Veronica Henry

This book’s description deemed it “A heart-warming short story to curl up with” and it really was just that. Admittedly, it didn’t take me long to read at all (hence the shortness of this review). Even in the very few pages the narrative takes place over, it really holds some heart-warming messages.

The reader is instantly welcomed by the friendly voice of Joe, which immediately made me want to read on to see how his story unravels. The fact  that the narrative starts with his voice  allows the reader to identify with him and build a sense of empathy, meaning that you care even more for him when things start to go wrong.

As someone from a small rural village, it was lovely to sample a piece of fiction that mirrored the same kind of close-knit community feeling that I have experienced as I was growing up. I especially loved that the main relationship between Joe and Emilia shows that a difference in age doesn’t affect the strength of a friendship.

It takes much less than a day to read, but I would recommend The Apple Orchard  to anyone in need of something to lift their mood. It most definitely fits the cliché ‘short but sweet’.