Kill Someone – Luke Smitherd

I wanted to read another action-filled book after my previous read, and the book description for Kill Someone seemed like it would do the trick.

My first impression was that it was very easy to read, Smitherd doesn’t use overly complicated vocabulary unnecessarily, which is something I really appreciate. We also get to know the main character very quickly, which makes it easy to become invested and interested in what the narrative may have in store for him.

Though I found the concept of The Man In White a little tongue in cheek and a little odd given that it is so removed from the reality of life, especially in semi-rural England, I was intrigued to see how a character, so obviously exaggerated, could fit into the narrative.  It turns out that having a character so removed from what is real helps to emphasise what is real, and helped to highlight the question of human nature and what we believe to be right and wrong. Chris is faced with a lose-lose situation, but he is forced to make a decision because The Man In White is able to put such an intense pressure on his conscience.

At the beginning, it seemed that the novel would be full of action and tension, wondering whether Chris would manage to achieve the goals he had been set, and what the consequences would be. However, the reality was that it seemed sort of a half-hearted attempt. Yes, there were moments of tension, but nothing that matched up to the promises that the Amazon book description seemed to make. In fact, after the initial uncertainty as to what might happen next, I found the narrative rather predictable: not in the way that I knew exactly what was going to happen and how, but that I could predict a general narrative arc.

I did like that the consequences of Chris’ actions were followed up towards the end of the book because it helped to complete the narrative- it also helped to build empathy for Chris as his personality is put under scrutiny.  But, once again, I didn’t really feel like this was done to its fullest potential- there were still questions left unanswered It was interesting to see quite a serious issue portrayed in a narrative form: how having a dark secret can force an individual to distance themselves from their family and friends. Also, I felt that the book showed that just because a person does bad things, they aren’t necessarily at peace with themselves afterwards. This meant it was a pleasant surprise to see Chris figure his life out and become more settled, in spite of the darkness that does surround him.

I was a little disappointed by the ending, as I felt that I had a lot of unanswered questions that I couldn’t begin to answer for myself. For some people, this would be a positive thing as it allows the reader to use their own imagination, but I like to be given concrete evidence (or at least a hint) of the future of the narrative after the end of the book.

Overall, I wouldn’t discourage people from reading this book- I was always interested in the narrative and never got bored of reading it. However, I would just warn that it is not as dramatic or impressive as I was expecting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s